Charities audit and finance committee effectiveness

Gender pay gap reporting

The gender pay gap reporting regulation came into being in April 2017. It has little by way of imposed sanctions, but carries considerable reputation risk for those with poor results or for those who do not make the required information readily and publicly available. Organisations need to manage how and when they are reporting, how to improve poor results but also how to manage the messaging around any published results. 

Gender pay gap reporting PDF

Men’s average pay is greater than that for women. The Office for National Statistics says that over the last 20 years the median gender pay gap has narrowed from 27.5 per cent to 9.4 per cent for full-time employees.

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Autumn Budget 2017 companies

The essentials of gender pay gap reporting

Employers need to publish their gender pay gap results within one year of their snapshot date. Failure to do so will be unlawful - so employers need to take steps in order to become compliant.

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Brexit
Brexit

Mind the gap

The news coverage and debate since the BBC published salary details for those in the corporation earning in excess of £150,000 has been immense, and a wake up call to CEOs and HR Directors to ‘mind the gap’.

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First Gender Pay Gap investigations to start in June 

Correspondence published today by the Treasury Select Committee suggests that the first investigations into non-compliance with the Gender Pay Gap reporting obligations could start as early as June this year.

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Brexit
Beyond the balance sheet

Beyond the balance sheet

Over the past decade, there’s been a major shift in our understanding of what it means to be a well-run organisation. Financial metrics are no longer the only yardsticks of success. Read more about how good governance should be top of mind and explore best practice tips.

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